Word of the Day: Ubiquitous

(adj.) \yü-ˈbi-kwə-təs\

Originally derived  from the noun, ubiquity, which refers to a presence everywhere at all times, this handy adjective describes something which is, or seems to be, everywhere. It can refer to something universally common, something pervasive in a certain context, or that which is encountered constantly. It is often used with some exaggeration, for things which seem unavoidable. There is also an adverb form; ubiquitously, and an additional noun form; ubiquitousness. That’s English for you.

The company’s advertising jingle is ubiquitous.
Chocolate is now a ubiquitous snack, but it used to be quite rare.
This is currently a ubiquitous fashion trend.
He is ubiquitous at family gatherings; it’s impossible to avoid him.

(n.) He strives for ubiquity/ubiquitousness. (Personally, I think the original is far less cumbersome)
(adv.) The pamphlets have been ubiquitously dispersed by a crowd of volunteers.

Etymology: 1830, from ubiquity (late 16th century), from Latin ubique ‘everywhere.‘ 
And now common things have a bit more flair, thanks to their ubiquitous nature!

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