Word of the Day: Ubiquitous

(adj.) \yü-ˈbi-kwə-təs\

Originally derived  from the noun, ubiquity, which refers to a presence everywhere at all times, this handy adjective describes something which is, or seems to be, everywhere. It can refer to something universally common, something pervasive in a certain context, or that which is encountered constantly. It is often used with some exaggeration, for things which seem unavoidable. There is also an adverb form; ubiquitously, and an additional noun form; ubiquitousness. That’s English for you.

The company’s advertising jingle is ubiquitous.
Chocolate is now a ubiquitous snack, but it used to be quite rare.
This is currently a ubiquitous fashion trend.
He is ubiquitous at family gatherings; it’s impossible to avoid him.

(n.) He strives for ubiquity/ubiquitousness. (Personally, I think the original is far less cumbersome)
(adv.) The pamphlets have been ubiquitously dispersed by a crowd of volunteers.

Etymology: 1830, from ubiquity (late 16th century), from Latin ubique ‘everywhere.‘ 
And now common things have a bit more flair, thanks to their ubiquitous nature!

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Word of the Day: Pareidolia

Hello, all! I am back after an unexpectedly long absence with a word that I adore, and had to share with you.

(n.) /pærɨˈdliə/ /parr-i-doh-lee-ə/

Pareidolia describes the imagined perception of a pattern or meaning where it does not actually exist, often attributing something familiar to random characteristics. This includes likening the pattern of craters on the moon to a human face, seeing shapes in the clouds, or hearing messages in music played at the wrong speed.
It was also likely a useful ability for our ancestors, to make sense out of a world which they did not have the science to explain.
 To demonstrate, here are a few birds flying over a cloudy sunset, but we can’t help but see them as smiley faces. Isn’t pareidolia cool?

Seeing patterns is a handy ability for us primates, but seeing patterns where none exist may well be the source of artistic expression.

Etymology: 20th century, from Greek; para (‘beside, instead of,’ or in this case, ‘faulty’) + eidolon (‘image, shape,form’).

Word of the day: Mellifluous

(adj.)  /mɛˈlɪflʊəs/

To me, this word seems to almost describe itself, or at least fall into its own description. Its meaning is that of a sound which is pleasingly smooth or musical to hear. It also has some versatility as an adverb (mellifluously) or as a noun (mellifluousness). It is figuratively something ‘honey-like,’ or the sound of one who is ‘honey-tongued.’ Enjoy!

Her low, mellifluous voice always made me feel better.
I find ‘mellifluous’ to be a mellifluous word.

Certain words just roll mellifluously off the tongue.
She speaks with magnificent mellifluousness and charms her audience completely.

Etymology: Late 15th century, from late Latin mellifluus (from mel ‘honey’ + fluere ‘to flow’).

Word of the day: Luculent

(adj.)  /ˈluːkjʊl(ə)nt/

This is a great, but underutilized, word which describes something that is clearly expressed, often in reference to writing or speech. The secondary meaning was once the more prevalent one -that of something brightly shining or illuminated- but it has since given way to the rather more poetic figurative sense. It also has an adverbial form; luculently. May it help you luculently convey your thoughts.

Examples of use;
The author’s style demonstrates a luculent understanding of people’s lives.
The musical score was frequently discordant, but contained moments of luculent beauty.
Her luculent argument was complemented by her natural charisma.

The complex nature of the subject makes it almost impossible to speak of it luculently.
It is luculently apparent that this course of action is the correct one.

Etymology: Late Middle English. From Latin luculentus, from lux, luc- ‘light’.

Word of the day: Logomachy

(n.)  /ləˈɡɒməki/

Apropos to the subject matter of Cor Lingua, logomachy refers to an argument about words. The plural, also usable as a count noun, is logomachies. Use it well, and I hope you don’t get into any logomachies over it – unless you want to, of course.

Examples of use:
They got into quite the heated logomachy.
Her favourite thing to do is engage in logomachy.

It will eventually be settled, after many late-night logomachies.
Logomachies are common in literary circles.

Etymology: Mid 16th century. From Greek logomakhia, from ‘logos’ (word) + ‘makhia’ (fighting).