Word of the day: Mellifluous

(adj.)  /mɛˈlɪflʊəs/

To me, this word seems to almost describe itself, or at least fall into its own description. Its meaning is that of a sound which is pleasingly smooth or musical to hear. It also has some versatility as an adverb (mellifluously) or as a noun (mellifluousness). It is figuratively something ‘honey-like,’ or the sound of one who is ‘honey-tongued.’ Enjoy!

Her low, mellifluous voice always made me feel better.
I find ‘mellifluous’ to be a mellifluous word.

Certain words just roll mellifluously off the tongue.
She speaks with magnificent mellifluousness and charms her audience completely.

Etymology: Late 15th century, from late Latin mellifluus (from mel ‘honey’ + fluere ‘to flow’).

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Word of the day: Luculent

(adj.)  /ˈluːkjʊl(ə)nt/

This is a great, but underutilized, word which describes something that is clearly expressed, often in reference to writing or speech. The secondary meaning was once the more prevalent one -that of something brightly shining or illuminated- but it has since given way to the rather more poetic figurative sense. It also has an adverbial form; luculently. May it help you luculently convey your thoughts.

Examples of use;
The author’s style demonstrates a luculent understanding of people’s lives.
The musical score was frequently discordant, but contained moments of luculent beauty.
Her luculent argument was complemented by her natural charisma.

The complex nature of the subject makes it almost impossible to speak of it luculently.
It is luculently apparent that this course of action is the correct one.

Etymology: Late Middle English. From Latin luculentus, from lux, luc- ‘light’.

Word of the day: Logomachy

(n.)  /ləˈɡɒməki/

Apropos to the subject matter of Cor Lingua, logomachy refers to an argument about words. The plural, also usable as a count noun, is logomachies. Use it well, and I hope you don’t get into any logomachies over it – unless you want to, of course.

Examples of use:
They got into quite the heated logomachy.
Her favourite thing to do is engage in logomachy.

It will eventually be settled, after many late-night logomachies.
Logomachies are common in literary circles.

Etymology: Mid 16th century. From Greek logomakhia, from ‘logos’ (word) + ‘makhia’ (fighting).

Word of the day: Velleity

(n.)  /vɛˈliːɪti/

Velleity is a perfect word to describe a wish or inclination which is not quite strong enough to actively pursue or lead a person to action. It can describe an idle wish or passing idea, as well. The plural is ‘velleities.’

Examples of use:
The idea was intriguing, but it remained a velleity.
Their head is full of velleities, but no real plans.

Etymology: Early 17th century. From Medieval Latin ‘velleitas’, from Latin ‘velle’ (to wish).

Word of the day: Blatherskite

(n.) /ˈblaðəskʌɪt/

We all know at least one of these, I think. Blatherskite is a charming word to describe a person who talks excessively but says little that makes sense. It can also be used as a mass noun to describe nonsense or talk without substance.

Examples of use:
That blatherskites in the café were annoying, yet somewhat entertaining.
Every time I post something, one of those trolling blatherskites chimes in.

He keeps trying to impress people, but he is just full of blatherskite.
Politicians have a tendency towards obfuscating blatherskite.

Etymology: Mid 17th century. From Scottish ‘blather’ (to talk excessively without sense) + ‘skate’ (denoting a person regarded with contempt).